18-19 May: Giorgio Resta and Enrico Maria Polimanti on Law and Music

Dear all,
on Wednesday and Thursday Prof. Giorgio Resta (University of RomaTre) will introduce us to the very special topic of Law and Music, with particular focus on the similarities between legal and musical interpretation.
20120517_113741ON WEDNESDAY MAY 18 THERE WILL BE A CONCERT IN ROOM 3 AT 2:00 PM WITH A PERFORMANCE OF M° ENRICO MARIA POLIMANTI, PROFESSIONAL PIANIST.
THIS VERY SPECIAL EVENT IS OPEN TO ALL PEOPLE INTERESTED: PLEASE PROMOTE IT AND INVITE WHO YOU WANT!
To read Prof. Resta’s CV click HERE.
More information about M° Polimanti on his personal website: www.enricomariapolimanti.com
SUGGESTED READINGS:
– J. Frank, Words and Music, in 47 “Columbia L. Rev.”, 1259 (1947) .
– D. Manderson, Fission and Fusion: From Improvisation to Formalism in Law and Music, in “Critical Studies in Improvisation”, 6.1. (2010).http://www.criticalimprov.com/article/viewArticle/1167/1726
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One thought on “18-19 May: Giorgio Resta and Enrico Maria Polimanti on Law and Music

  1. Franziska Hertzberg says:

    Law and Music
    During our lesson we spoke a lot about law and music with regard to classical pieces from a few centuries ago, less about how music is used for example nowadays and its connection to law. It got me thinking how law is implemented and played with in music in general, because I think through music, criticism and controversial topics, also related to politics but also law, can be dealt with incredibly well. One song came to my head All the things she said is a song by the Russian girl group t.A.T.u. that was released in 2002. The song deals with the love between two girls, who are unable to show that, as it is first of all forbidden in their country and second of all still not accepted or considered as ‘normal’ in their society. So here is the first issue raised by the singers: homosexuality. Trying to provoke and initiate discussion and evolution in the mindset, hence eventually legalisation, in Russian society, they released that very controversial song, talking about disorientation, shame and helplessness that those two girls are going through. The second wave of criticism that was set off was (probably not intended though): paedophilia. The song was really successful in the UK and Australia, where, amongst critics, it raised the issue of promoting paedophilia. The video showed two young girls in school uniform kissing each other, while being looked at by a crowd of people behind a fence. Ultimately the video and the song were even banned by some TV channels. So here we also have the issue of music being against the law, being illegal in that sense, because it is speaking or dealing with a forbidden issue in society in a ‘favouring’ (apparently) way.
    Related to that, is the punishment of the girl band Pussy Riot in 2012. Three of the bands members went to sing critical parodies in a church in Moscow, leading to an imprisonment for a few years. The aim was to condemn the churches attempt to prohibit abortion and also the Russian President Putin and his regime. This event also caused a lot of negative criticism amongst politicians, musicians, organisations like Amnesty International and people all over the world, defying the censorship of freedom of speech and women’s rights etc. In this case some fundamental Human Rights were violated. The role of music here again, being the funnel to express and highlight dysfunctions or discontent, even though according to the law this was an illegal act. I think this is also very closely related to law and literature, because obviously the lyrics play a crucial part, but also the music or the means by which the lyrics are supported e.g. voice, instruments etc. give the effect and shape the perception.

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