CFP: The Documedia Revolution (University of Torino, 4-5-6 October 2018)

The Documedia Revolution

DOCAM, Document Academy

 15th Annual Meeting 2018

University of Torino, Palazzo Nuovo, Ground Floor

Scienza Nuova Centre for Advanced Studies

4-5-6 October 2018

The 2018 conference is hosted by the Department of Philosophy and Education Sciences at the University of Torino, in Italy. The conference co-chairs are Angela Condello and Maurizio Ferraris.

The conference will be the inaugural event of a new Centre for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and Industry 4.0, called “Scienza Nuova” (at the University of Torino).

You can read all the details also in the attached PDF: Final_CallDOCAMTorino018_Final.

We are delighted to announce the following keynote speakers:

  • Michael Buckland (University of California at Berkeley, USA)
  • Gregory Currie (University of York) – T.B.C.
  • Ronald Day (Indiana University–Bloomington, USA)
  • Claire Scopsi (CNAM, France)
  • Barry Smith (University at Buffalo, USA)

We are in the middle of a revolution. More precisely, we are dealing with the third revolution, after the industrial and the media revolutions: the “documedia revolution.” In this revolution, the constitutive power of documents and the mobilizing power of the media interact. Data and recordings are archived while, at the same time, they can circulate on the web. The workers’ alienation mentioned by Marx has been replaced by dynamics such as valorization and recognition, and the exploitation now takes place over the human capital embodied by the consumer (beauty, fashion, posts, cooking, mass vacations…): can this be called “exploitation”? Recognition and social prestige seem to be the most valuable aspects of human life today.

This conference aims at discussing different aspects of the documedia revolution, and specifically both its causes (the nature of documents and of recordings and their relationship with modernity) and consequences (publicity, recognition, visibility, mobilization).

Mainly, but not exclusively, we invite papers that deal with following questions:

  • Has the definition of “document” changed in the web era?
  • What objects would we classify as documents today?
  • Can we imagine a new hermeneutics in the era of technology, a sort of “technological hermeneutics”?
  • Has the concept of “trust” changed in the web era?

The Conference will be organized according to this tentative prospective sessions, but not esclusively (other themes and perspectives will be welcome):

  • Forms of the Document: the Legal Perspective
  • Art and the Documedia Revolution
  • The Role of Technology in the Documedia Revolution
  • Documents and Commodities

Submission Details

All proposals, including posters, must include:

  • description: a short (500 words) description of the work to be presented;
  • names of all contributors;
  • addresses, including email contacts;
  • up to 5 keywords.

Paper proposals should also include:

  • explanation of how they will be presented (verbally only, with presentation software, video, performance, or other forms of demonstration);
  • special equipment needs.

Proposals should be submitted electronically to angela.condello@unito.it.

All paper sessions will be plenary and given 40 minutes, which includes discussion.

Conference language is English.

Submission deadline for proposals: May 30th, 2018. Receipt will be confirmed within one week. Decisions will be announced by as soon as possible following the deadline.

Presentations will be eligible for publication in Proceedings from the Document Academy.  Accepted authors who foresee wanting to publish in the proceedings should begin preparing their manuscripts over the summer. Completed manuscripts will be due in late October; details forthcoming.

The Document Academy fosters a multidisciplinary space for experimental and critical research on the document in the widest sense, drawing on scholarship, traditions, and experiences from the arts, humanities, social sciences, education, and natural science, and from diverse fields, such as information, media, museum, archives, culture, and science studies. DOCAM originated as a co-sponsored effort by the Program of Documentation Studies, University of Tromso, Norway, and the School of Information, University of California, Berkeley.

DOCAM 2018 is the 15th annual meeting of the Document Academy, an international network of scholars, artists, and professionals in various fields, who are interested in the exploration of the concept of the document as a resource for scholarly, artistic, and professional work.

Please check also the website: http://documentacademy.org/?index

And the Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TheDocumentAcademy/

CFP: 23rd ANNUAL FORUM OF YOUNG LEGAL HISTORIANS (NAPLES, MAY 30 – JUNE 1, 2017)

forum2017

Call for Papers

Under the title “History of Law and Other Humanities: Views of the Legal Culture across the Time” the Forum will be devoted to the Relations between Law and Humanities, in order to propose new instruments of research.

Deadline: 15 March 2017

Conference fee: 100 EUR

Contact: forum2017aylh@gmail.com

Organizing Committee: Valerio Massimo Minale and Virginia Amorosi

All information HERE.

 

CFP: 18TH INTERNATIONAL ROUNDTABLE FOR THE SEMIOTICS OF LAW 2017 (Cardozo Law School, NY)

CALL-FOR- PAPERS

18TH INTERNATIONAL ROUNDTABLE FOR THE SEMIOTICS OF LAW 2017

The 18th International Roundtable for the Semiotics of Law (IRSL 2017, hosted by the Cardozo Law School  in collaboration with the University of Roma Tre – Law School), will take place from 25 May to 28 May 2017.

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SINGULARITY, GENERALITY AND EXEMPLARITY IN LEGAL DISCOURSE

The use and practice of exemplarity are rooted in classic rhetoric, literature, politics and law. Because of the shift from pre-modern to modern ways of thinking – as modern knowledge came to privilege abstraction over exempla, the general over the singular and particular – exemplarity lost its way.

The aim of this Roundtable is to discuss how in the contemporary legal discourse exemplarity regained relevance in human and legal thought: it constitutes the “compromise” between different orders: positive law (civil law, common law) and natural law, general and particular, abstract and concrete, societal and individual. Exemplary judgments (at a national and at an international level, e.g. Landgericht Köln – N. 151 Ns 169/11; Enel v. Costa; Scordino v. Italy) bridge the divide between traditional dichotomies, such as Common Law/Civil Law and positive law/natural law — by linking the ordinary (cases that are already described by a norm, which provides for them) and the extreme (cases that challenge the normative order because they are not yet provided for by law).

The legal exemplary case embodies the tension between ordinary – extraordinary and general – singular, and at the same time it offers a model, a solution to “go through” that tension. The tension between ordinary and extraordinary is, in the law, related to the essential juridical tension between facts and norms. From a philosophical perspective, exemplary and paradigmatic forms are elements that constitute the hermeneutic parameters of a given context.

In its many forms, exemplarity entails the dialectical oscillation around an internal divide: whether it comes as paradeigma or paradigm, as exemplum, exemplar, or mere instance, as Exempel or Beispiel, as model or precedent, exemplarity mediates between the singular and the general. Especially in philosophy, the use of examples has often been devoted to the mere didactic illustration of general concepts for those unable to understand them without assistance from concrete cases or instances. “Examples are thus the go-cart of judgment,” as Immanuel Kant’s well-known dictum goes, “which he who is deficient in that natural talent cannot afford to dispense with” (CPR: B 174).

Natural law re-emerges through exemplarity in the form of the “just” reason in the specific case: the single narrative in the single case challenges the ratio legis by proposing a new and different ratio. The particular and the universal are given in the same form through the exemplary case because they express a contradiction between extra-legal values and abstract and general rules.

CALL FOR PAPERS/ABSTRACTS

Abstracts of 300 words (max.) can be submitted by 1 December 2016 to Angela Condello (angela.condello@uniroma3.it) and Peter Goodrich (goodrich@yu.edu) with participation decisions made by 1 January 2017.

CFP: No Foundations

No Foundations is currently accepting general submissions and book reviews for NoFo 13 (2016). To facilitate the review process please send us your manuscript before March 1, 2016. Please include an abstract of no more than 200 words with your submission.
http://www.helsinki.fi/nofo/

NO FOUNDATIONS:

AN INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL

OF LAW AND JUSTICE

No Foundations is an international peer-reviewed journal committed to publishing interdisciplinary legal scholarship of the highest quality at the interface between law and justice. We encourage contributions from all areas of law and beyond, with the aim of bridging the gap once opened between law and other social and human activities and experiences.

On the assumption that law is a socially embedded phenomenon that cannot be fully understood as an autonomous discipline, we aim to connect law both with its real effects on the lives of individuals and societies, and with the realm of human aspirations and ideals that give it life and meaning.

 

CFP: Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia Conference

University of Technology Sydney Law School, Sydney, Australia
Dates: 9-12 December 2015
(with 9 December as a postgraduate day)

Deadline for Stream Proposals: 30 June, 2015

Deadline for Paper and Panel Proposals: 30 June 2015

CFP Australiasia conference 2015Download the entire pdf HERE: __LLH_CFP_June.

Complicity is a state of being complex or involved, and no matter where we are, or what we do, law is part of our entanglement in the world. This conference will explore law’s complex relations with culture, politics and capital. It will investigate law as an accomplice, as well as law’s role in shaping (and resisting) certain problematic moral, political and material positions.

The LLH Association of Australasia invites scholarly and creative research from academics and graduate students working at the intersection of law and the humanities, whether based in legal theory or in disciplines such as literature, art, film, music, history, continental philosophy, anthropology, psychoanalysis, visual culture, or cultural studies. Contributions may take a variety of forms from traditional academic papers to poster presentations, video, or other genres or media.

The conference invites consideration of the following questions:

• What does complicity reveal about law’s methods and modes, its affects and effects?

• How are law’s genres, narratives, processes and images complicit in the creation of particular imaginaries, materialities and practices of the everyday?

• How might we work within visual, narrative, creative and textual domains and devise strategies to reveal and counter law’s complicities, and acknowledge our own?

We ask you to make your own interpretation of the theme ‘Complicities,’ and invite scholars from a range of disciplines to propose papers, complete panels and streams. Proposals should consist of a short abstract (max. 250 words). Please email your abstract to llh@uts.edu.au. Please include your name and the word Complicities in the subject line.

For all conference information including on-line registration, check our web site at this address:http://llh.uts.edu.au

And for further information, contact the Co-convenors, Dr Honni van Rijswijk and Associate Professor Penny Crofts at llh@uts.edu.au

CFP: Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia Conference (Sidney, 9-12 December 2015)

lrc-complicities-main3What: Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia Conference

Where: University of Technology Sydney Law School,Sydney, Australia

When: 9-12 December 2015 (with 9 December as a postgraduate day)

Complicity is a state of being complex or involved, and no matter where we are, or what we do, law is part of our entanglement in the world. This conference will explore law’s complex relations with culture, politics and capital. It will investigate law as an accomplice, as well as law’s role in shaping (and resisting) certain problematic moral, political and material positions.

The LLH Association of Australasia invites scholarly and creative research from academics and graduate students working at the intersection of law and the humanities, whether based in legal theory or in disciplines such as literature, art, film, music, history, continental philosophy, anthropology, psychoanalysis, visual culture, or cultural studies. Contributions may take a variety of forms from traditional academic papers to poster presentations, video, or other genres or media.

The conference invites consideration of the following questions:

• What does complicity reveal about law’s methods and modes, its affects and effects?

• How are law’s genres, narratives, processes and images complicit in the creation of particular imaginaries, materialities and practices of the everyday?

• How might we work within visual, narrative, creative and textual domains and devise strategies to reveal and counter law’s complicities, and acknowledge our own?

We ask you to make your own interpretation of the theme ‘Complicities,’ and invite scholars from a range of disciplines to propose papers, complete panels and streams. Proposals should consist of a short abstract (max. 250 words). Please email your abstract to llh@uts.edu.au. Please include your name and the word Complicities in the subject line.

Deadline for Stream Proposals: 31 March, 2015 

Deadline for Paper and Panel Proposals: 1 May 2015

For all conference information including on-line registration, check our web site at THIS address

And for further information, contact the Co-convenors, Dr Honni van Rijswijk and Associate Professor Penny Crofts.